Data

A User Preference Analysis Of Commercial Breath Ketone Sensors to Inform the Development of Portable Breath Ketone Sensors for Diabetes Management in Young People

Also known as: Young People Informing Development of Portable Breath Ketone Sensors for Diabetes Management
The Australian National University
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25911/hxk7-c843&rft.title=A User Preference Analysis Of Commercial Breath Ketone Sensors to Inform the Development of Portable Breath Ketone Sensors for Diabetes Management in Young People&rft.identifier=10.25911/hxk7-c843&rft.publisher=The Australian National University&rft.description=Background. Portable breath ketone sensors may help people with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) avoid episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis; however, the design features preferred by users have not been studied. We aimed to elucidate breath analysis and design preferences associated with commercial breath ketone devices among young people with T1DM aged 12-16 years and their parents in order to inform the development of a breath ketone sensor prototype for diabetes management in young people. Research Designs and Methods. Two commercially available breath ketone sensors, designed for ketogenic diet monitoring, were explored over one week by ten young people with T1DM. Participants interacted with the devices at least twice daily for five days to simulate a real-life usage of the breath devices in addition to blood testing devices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted post-testing with the young participants and their caregivers to elicit preferences related to breath analysis and to inform the co-design of a diabetes breath ketone sensor prototype. To validate the results from a professional healthcare perspective, we interviewed two diabetes educators working in paediatric care about their perspective of young people using breath ketone sensors. We aimed to elucidate breath analysis and design preferences associated with commercial breath ketone devices among young people with T1DM aged 12-16 years and their parents in order to inform the development of a breath ketone sensor prototype for diabetes management in young people&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2022&rft_rights= http://legaloffice.weblogs.anu.edu.au/content/copyright/&rft_rights= http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_subject=Endocrinology&rft_subject=Clinical sciences&rft_subject=BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Digital health&rft_subject=Health services and systems&rft_subject=HEALTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=Breath sensor&rft_subject=Diabetes&rft_subject=Ketones&rft_subject=User preference&rft_subject=Young people&rft_subject=Co-design&rft_subject=Qualitative&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Data will be made available on completion of the study, including publication of key findings, which I expect to be at the end of 2022.

Contact Information

Postal Address:
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health College of Health and Medicine Australian National University 63 Eggleston Road Acton ACT 2601

Street Address:
Ph: +612 6125 6545

jane.desborough@anu.edu.au

Full description

Background. Portable breath ketone sensors may help people with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) avoid episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis; however, the design features preferred by users have not been studied. We aimed to elucidate breath analysis and design preferences associated with commercial breath ketone devices among young people with T1DM aged 12-16 years and their parents in order to inform the development of a breath ketone sensor prototype for diabetes management in young people.
Research Designs and Methods. Two commercially available breath ketone sensors, designed for ketogenic diet monitoring, were explored over one week by ten young people with T1DM. Participants interacted with the devices at least twice daily for five days to simulate a real-life usage of the breath devices in addition to blood testing devices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted post-testing with the young participants and their caregivers to elicit preferences related to breath analysis and to inform the co-design of a diabetes breath ketone sensor prototype. To validate the results from a professional healthcare perspective, we interviewed two diabetes educators working in paediatric care about their perspective of young people using breath ketone sensors.

Notes

12 files.
2.37 MB.

Significance statement

We aimed to elucidate breath analysis and design preferences associated with commercial breath ketone devices among young people with T1DM aged 12-16 years and their parents in order to inform the development of a breath ketone sensor prototype for diabetes management in young people

Created: 2020

Data time period: 2020-06-01 to 2020-07-30

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