Data

2021 State of the Environment Report Marine Chapter – Expert Assessment – State and Trend – Secondary production (zooplankton)

Australian Ocean Data Network
Richardson, Anthony ; Everett, Jason ; Davies, Claire ; Rochester, Wayne
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=DOI: 10.26198/2rsb-x342&rft.title=2021 State of the Environment Report Marine Chapter – Expert Assessment – State and Trend – Secondary production (zooplankton)&rft.identifier=DOI: 10.26198/2rsb-x342&rft.publisher=Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (DAWE)&rft.description=The Marine chapter of the 2021 State of the Environment (SoE) report incorporates multiple expert templates developed from streams of marine data. This metadata record describes the Expert Assessment State and Trend of secondary production (zooplankton). ***A PDF of the full Expert Assessment, including figures and tables (where provided) is downloadable in the On-line Resources section of this record as EXPERT ASSESSMENT 2021 - Secondary Production (Zooplankton)*** ---------------------------------------- DESCRIPTION OF SPECIES/COMMUNITY/PROCESS FOR EXPERT ASSESSMENT Secondary production in the ocean is the generation of biomass by zooplankton – the primary consumers of phytoplankton. The most common zooplankton, the copepods, are the most abundant animals on Earth, even potentially outnumbering insects (Schminke 2006). Zooplankton are important components of the biological pump, shunting carbon from surface to deeper waters through sinking of faeces, exuviae and carcasses (Turner 2015). The recruitment of fish and the carrying capacity of marine ecosystems – the mass of fish, squid, shellfish, marine mammals, seabirds and sea turtles – is regulated by secondary production (Bakun 2006). Productivity hotspots, such as Eden and Bonney upwelling zones, have high densities of zooplankton, sustaining invertebrates, fish and whales alike (Gill 2002). DATA STREAM(S) USED IN EXPERT ASSESSMENT We analysed secondary production (zooplankton) data in Coastal areas (from nets at IMOS National Reference Stations, see Eriksen et al. (2019) for detailed methodology) and Offshore bioregions (from the IMOS Australian Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey, see Richardson et al. (2006) for detailed methodology). ---------------------------------------- 2021 SOE ASSESSMENT SUMMARY [see attached Expert Assessment for full details] • 2021 • Assessment grade: Very good Assessment trend: Improving Confidence grade: Somewhat adequate Confidence trend: Somewhat adequate Comparability: Somewhat comparable (2016 assessment was based the same data sources but trends were assessed in terms of biomass). • 2016 • Assessment grade: Very good Assessment trend: Stable Confidence grade: Limited evidence or limited consensus Confidence trend: Limited evidence or limited consensus Comparability: Not previously assessed • 2011 • (not previously assessed) ---------------------------------------- CHANGES SINCE 2016 SOE ASSESSMENT The 2016 assessment based only on IMOS CPR data suggested the trend in zooplankton abundance was stable. The longer IMOS time series now available, together with combined information from both the NRS and AusCPR, have provided more data and greater confidence in the results.QUALITY OF DATA USED IN THE ASSESSMENT IMOS data used in this assessment are the only zooplankton time series information available in Australia. Before the introduction of IMOS, no assessment of secondary production was possible. Collecting and counting zooplankton data in IMOS adheres to strict quality control protocols (Eriksen et al. 2019, Batten et al. 2019, Richardson et al. 2006). For collection of data on zooplankton in Coastal areas, we use a fine mesh net (100 µm), which retains much of the zooplankton community. The diversity index we calculated should be robust, as we used data on 272 species of copepods.&rft.creator=Richardson, Anthony &rft.creator=Everett, Jason &rft.creator=Davies, Claire &rft.creator=Rochester, Wayne &rft.date=2021&rft.coverage=northlimit=-7.207031249999999; southlimit=-47.4609375; westlimit=102.65625000000001; eastLimit=162.421875&rft.coverage=northlimit=-7.207031249999999; southlimit=-47.4609375; westlimit=102.65625000000001; eastLimit=162.421875&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=oceans&rft_subject=secondary production&rft_subject=expert assessment&rft_subject=zooplankton&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
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Brief description

The Marine chapter of the 2021 State of the Environment (SoE) report incorporates multiple expert templates developed from streams of marine data. This metadata record describes the Expert Assessment "State and Trend of secondary production (zooplankton)".
***A PDF of the full Expert Assessment, including figures and tables (where provided) is downloadable in the "On-line Resources" section of this record as "EXPERT ASSESSMENT 2021 - Secondary Production (Zooplankton)"***

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DESCRIPTION OF SPECIES/COMMUNITY/PROCESS FOR EXPERT ASSESSMENT
Secondary production in the ocean is the generation of biomass by zooplankton – the primary consumers of phytoplankton. The most common zooplankton, the copepods, are the most abundant animals on Earth, even potentially outnumbering insects (Schminke 2006). Zooplankton are important components of the biological pump, shunting carbon from surface to deeper waters through sinking of faeces, exuviae and carcasses (Turner 2015). The recruitment of fish and the carrying capacity of marine ecosystems – the mass of fish, squid, shellfish, marine mammals, seabirds and sea turtles – is regulated by secondary production (Bakun 2006). Productivity hotspots, such as Eden and Bonney upwelling zones, have high densities of zooplankton, sustaining invertebrates, fish and whales alike (Gill 2002).

DATA STREAM(S) USED IN EXPERT ASSESSMENT
We analysed secondary production (zooplankton) data in Coastal areas (from nets at IMOS National Reference Stations, see Eriksen et al. (2019) for detailed methodology) and Offshore bioregions (from the IMOS Australian Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey, see Richardson et al. (2006) for detailed methodology).

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2021 SOE ASSESSMENT SUMMARY [see attached Expert Assessment for full details]

• 2021 •
Assessment grade: Very good
Assessment trend: Improving
Confidence grade: Somewhat adequate
Confidence trend: Somewhat adequate
Comparability: Somewhat comparable (2016 assessment was based the same data sources but trends were assessed in terms of biomass).
• 2016 •
Assessment grade: Very good
Assessment trend: Stable
Confidence grade: Limited evidence or limited consensus
Confidence trend: Limited evidence or limited consensus
Comparability: Not previously assessed
• 2011 •
(not previously assessed)

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CHANGES SINCE 2016 SOE ASSESSMENT
The 2016 assessment based only on IMOS CPR data suggested the trend in zooplankton abundance was stable. The longer IMOS time series now available, together with combined information from both the NRS and AusCPR, have provided more data and greater confidence in the results.

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QUALITY OF DATA USED IN THE ASSESSMENT
IMOS data used in this assessment are the only zooplankton time series information available in Australia. Before the introduction of IMOS, no assessment of secondary production was possible. Collecting and counting zooplankton data in IMOS adheres to strict quality control protocols (Eriksen et al. 2019, Batten et al. 2019, Richardson et al. 2006). For collection of data on zooplankton in Coastal areas, we use a fine mesh net (100 µm), which retains much of the zooplankton community. The diversity index we calculated should be robust, as we used data on 272 species of copepods.

Notes

Credit
Peer reviews of this assessment were provided by: Kerrie Swadling (Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania)

Created: 19 01 2021

This dataset is part of a larger collection

162.42188,-7.20703 162.42188,-47.46094 102.65625,-47.46094 102.65625,-7.20703 162.42188,-7.20703

132.5390625,-27.333984375

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Other Information
EXPERT ASSESSMENT 2021 - Secondary Production (Zooplankton) [direct download] (SoE_2021_MARINE_State_and_Trend__secondary_production.pdf)

uri : https://catalogue.aodn.org.au:443/geonetwork/srv/api/records/d78ca5eb-e630-4936-b37f-911ef9e54e69/attachments/SoE_2021_MARINE_State_and_Trend__secondary_production.pdf

(State of the Environment (SoE) reporting webpage)

uri : https://www.environment.gov.au/science/soe

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