Dataset

Xylomelum occidentale (Proteaceae) accesses relatively mobile soil organic phosphorus without releasing carboxylates

The University of Western Australia
Zhong, Hongtao ; Zhou, Jun ; Wan Azmi, Azrul ; Jardim Arruda, Andre ; Doolette, Ashlea L ; Smernik, Ronald J ; Lambers, Hans
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.5061/dryad.05qfttdz7&rft.title=Xylomelum occidentale (Proteaceae) accesses relatively mobile soil organic phosphorus without releasing carboxylates&rft.identifier=10.5061/dryad.05qfttdz7&rft.publisher=Dryad Digital Repository&rft.description=1. Hundreds of Proteaceae species in Australia and South Africa typically grow on phosphorus (P)-impoverished soils, exhibiting a carboxylate-releasing P-mobilising strategy. In the Southwest Australian Biodiversity Hotspot, two Xylomelum (Proteaceae) species are widely distributed, but restricted within that distribution. 2. We grew X. occidentale in hydroponics at 1 μM P. Leaves, seeds, rhizosheath and bulk soil were collected in natural habitats. 3. Xylomelum occidentale did not produce functional cluster roots and occupied soils that are somewhat less P-impoverished than those in typical Proteaceae habitats in the region. Based on measurements of foliar manganese concentrations (a proxy for rhizosphere carboxylate concentrations) and P fractions in bulk and rhizosheath soil, we conclude that X. occidentale accesses organic P, without releasing carboxylates. Solution 31P-NMR revealed which organic P forms X. occidentale accessed. 4. Xylomelum occidentale uses a strategy that differs fundamentally from that typical in Proteaceae, accessing soil organic P without carboxylates. We surmise that this novel strategy is likely expressed also in co-occurring non-Proteaceae that lack a carboxylate-exuding strategy, and plants in similar habitats. These co-occurring species are unlikely to benefit from mycorrhizal associations, because plant-available soil P concentrations are too low. 5. Synthesis. Our findings show the first field evidence of effectively utilising soil organic P by X. occidentale without carboxylate exudation and explain their relatively restricted distribution in an old P-impoverished landscape, contributing to a better understanding of how diverse P-acquisition strategies coexist in a megadiverse ecosystem.,Soil chemical data. Soils were field-collected from natural habitats of Xylomelum occidentale. Soil data in this file include: pH, EC, total phosphorus (P), organic P, inorganic P. resin P, total carbon, soil organic matter, and soil organic carbon. This soil_chemical_data.csv file was created using Microsoft Excel 2013.,Leaf chemistry data: elemental concentrations. Leaves were field-collected from natural habitats of Xylomelum species. This leaf_chemistry_data.csv file was created using Microsoft Excel 2013.,&rft.creator=Zhong, Hongtao &rft.creator=Zhou, Jun &rft.creator=Wan Azmi, Azrul &rft.creator=Jardim Arruda, Andre &rft.creator=Doolette, Ashlea L &rft.creator=Smernik, Ronald J &rft.creator=Lambers, Hans &rft.date=2019&rft.relation=http://research-repository.uwa.edu.au/en/publications/a71600b9-8bf3-4b46-87fc-56d1b7d46adf&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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1. Hundreds of Proteaceae species in Australia and South Africa typically grow on phosphorus (P)-impoverished soils, exhibiting a carboxylate-releasing P-mobilising strategy. In the Southwest Australian Biodiversity Hotspot, two Xylomelum (Proteaceae) species are widely distributed, but restricted within that distribution. 2. We grew X. occidentale in hydroponics at 1 μM P. Leaves, seeds, rhizosheath and bulk soil were collected in natural habitats. 3. Xylomelum occidentale did not produce functional cluster roots and occupied soils that are somewhat less P-impoverished than those in typical Proteaceae habitats in the region. Based on measurements of foliar manganese concentrations (a proxy for rhizosphere carboxylate concentrations) and P fractions in bulk and rhizosheath soil, we conclude that X. occidentale accesses organic P, without releasing carboxylates. Solution 31P-NMR revealed which organic P forms X. occidentale accessed. 4. Xylomelum occidentale uses a strategy that differs fundamentally from that typical in Proteaceae, accessing soil organic P without carboxylates. We surmise that this novel strategy is likely expressed also in co-occurring non-Proteaceae that lack a carboxylate-exuding strategy, and plants in similar habitats. These co-occurring species are unlikely to benefit from mycorrhizal associations, because plant-available soil P concentrations are too low. 5. Synthesis. Our findings show the first field evidence of effectively utilising soil organic P by X. occidentale without carboxylate exudation and explain their relatively restricted distribution in an old P-impoverished landscape, contributing to a better understanding of how diverse P-acquisition strategies coexist in a megadiverse ecosystem.,Soil chemical data. Soils were field-collected from natural habitats of Xylomelum occidentale. Soil data in this file include: pH, EC, total phosphorus (P), organic P, inorganic P. resin P, total carbon, soil organic matter, and soil organic carbon. This soil_chemical_data.csv file was created using Microsoft Excel 2013.,Leaf chemistry data: elemental concentrations. Leaves were field-collected from natural habitats of Xylomelum species. This leaf_chemistry_data.csv file was created using Microsoft Excel 2013.,

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Associated Persons
Jun Zhou (Contributor); Azrul Wan Azmi (Contributor); Andre Jardim Arruda (Creator)Ashlea L Doolette (Creator); Ronald J Smernik (Creator)

Issued: 2019-01-01

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