Data

Vulnerability maps identifying the response of threatened species in Northern Australia to specific threatening processes

James Cook University
Pintor, A
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25903/5d2d3d79a6837&rft.title=Vulnerability maps identifying the response of threatened species in Northern Australia to specific threatening processes&rft.identifier=10.25903/5d2d3d79a6837&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=Successful threatened species management requires knowledge of where a species is present and how it is affected by threatening processes across its range. It follows that vulnerability is determined by 1. How exposed a species is to a threat and 2. How sensitive it is to different levels of that threat. If exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability are known, targeted threat mitigation and management becomes feasible. For example, species A may occur in the Wet Tropics and be sensitive to grazing at medium or high levels because it requires ground cover. If the overall vulnerability of this species is to be reduced, we need to know where its range overlaps with grazed areas, and where grazing is above medium levels. In those overlapping areas, we can then aim to manage grazing at slightly lower levels to permit the species’ populations to recover. This study used previously mapped distributions of threatened species as well as previously mapped threatening processes across Northern Australia, and a sensitivity matrix of species x threat interactions to create maps of species’ vulnerability across their range within Northern Australia. Vulnerability was defined as the product of exposure and sensitivity, i.e. the more sensitive a species is to a threat and the more exposed it is to that same threat, the higher its vulnerability with respect to that threat. In the context of this study, exposure was defined as any areas of suitable habitat that overlap with the presence of a particular threat. Within this area of overlap, different threat intensities or probabilities may occur. To estimate the vulnerability of a species across its exposed range, one therefore needs to have an idea of what its response to these different levels of threat is likely to be.  We estimated this based on a previous study using an extensive expert elicitation process to determine the responses of different functional groups to low, medium, or high threat levels. For each threat x species interaction, an exposure map was created (areas of overlap between species range and threat presence). The different threat levels within the exposed areas were then transformed into the corresponding risk of extinction at that threat level for that species in each pixel. Two different outputs are available for any species x threat interaction (if the species was actually sensitive to the threat): exposure (overlap of species and threat) and vulnerability (species estimated response to different threat levels across its exposure range).The outputs discussed above were used to create maps of cumulative vulnerability for each species across all threats, for each threat across all species, and across taxonomic groups. A summary map of cumulative vulnerability across all species and threats included in this study was also produced. For example, the Purple-crowned Fairy-wren (Malurus coronatus) has several outputs describing how vulnerable it is to each threat across its range within Northern Australia. If all of these are added together, we can see how vulnerable the species is over all across its range. If we then add this total vulnerability of this species and all other bird species together, we get a cumulative vulnerability map for birds across Northern Australia. The outputs of this study are intended for use by governments and stakeholders for more effective conservation decisions and threatened species management across Northern Australia. This collection contains maps of the vulnerability of threatened species in Northern Australia to specific threatening processes across their distribution as well as summary maps describing cumulative vulnerability across different threats and groups of species. &rft.creator=Pintor, A &rft.date=2019&rft.coverage=126.72454833985,-11.845398881854 113.36517333984,-20.282379170719 113.36517333984,-39.350936261967 130.59173583985,-33.41271998209 136.91986083985,-38.255076794861 152.38861083985,-46.543434648425 153.79486083985,-18.291514957697 142.54486083985,-9.7735732983083 142.89642333985,-9.4269348854425 126.72454833985,-11.845398881854&rft.coverage=Australia&rft_rights=&rft_rights=CC BY-SA: Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 AU http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/au&rft_subject=threatened species&rft_subject=conservation planning&rft_subject=northern Australia&rft_subject=expert elicitation &rft_subject=tropical biodiversity&rft_subject=ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies&rft_subject=Conservation and Biodiversity&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=Global Change Biology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=OTHER BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Environmental Management&rft_subject=Wildlife and Habitat Management&rft_subject=Ecosystem Assessment and Management at Regional or Larger Scales&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENT&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=Institutional Arrangements for Environmental Protection&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE EVALUATION&rft_subject=Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales&rft_subject=FLORA, FAUNA AND BIODIVERSITY&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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CC BY-SA: Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 AU
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/au

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Brief description

This collection contains maps of the vulnerability of threatened species in Northern Australia to specific threatening processes across their distribution as well as summary maps describing cumulative vulnerability across different threats and groups of species.

 

Full description

Successful threatened species management requires knowledge of where a species is present and how it is affected by threatening processes across its range. It follows that vulnerability is determined by 1. How exposed a species is to a threat and 2. How sensitive it is to different levels of that threat. If exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability are known, targeted threat mitigation and management becomes feasible. For example, species A may occur in the Wet Tropics and be sensitive to grazing at medium or high levels because it requires ground cover. If the overall vulnerability of this species is to be reduced, we need to know where its range overlaps with grazed areas, and where grazing is above medium levels. In those overlapping areas, we can then aim to manage grazing at slightly lower levels to permit the species’ populations to recover. This study used previously mapped distributions of threatened species as well as previously mapped threatening processes across Northern Australia, and a sensitivity matrix of species x threat interactions to create maps of species’ vulnerability across their range within Northern Australia. Vulnerability was defined as the product of exposure and sensitivity, i.e. the more sensitive a species is to a threat and the more exposed it is to that same threat, the higher its vulnerability with respect to that threat. In the context of this study, exposure was defined as any areas of suitable habitat that overlap with the presence of a particular threat. Within this area of overlap, different threat intensities or probabilities may occur. To estimate the vulnerability of a species across its exposed range, one therefore needs to have an idea of what its response to these different levels of threat is likely to be.  We estimated this based on a previous study using an extensive expert elicitation process to determine the responses of different functional groups to low, medium, or high threat levels. For each threat x species interaction, an exposure map was created (areas of overlap between species range and threat presence). The different threat levels within the exposed areas were then transformed into the corresponding risk of extinction at that threat level for that species in each pixel. Two different outputs are available for any species x threat interaction (if the species was actually sensitive to the threat): exposure (overlap of species and threat) and vulnerability (species estimated response to different threat levels across its exposure range).The outputs discussed above were used to create maps of cumulative vulnerability for each species across all threats, for each threat across all species, and across taxonomic groups. A summary map of cumulative vulnerability across all species and threats included in this study was also produced. For example, the Purple-crowned Fairy-wren (Malurus coronatus) has several outputs describing how vulnerable it is to each threat across its range within Northern Australia. If all of these are added together, we can see how vulnerable the species is over all across its range. If we then add this total vulnerability of this species and all other bird species together, we get a cumulative vulnerability map for birds across Northern Australia. The outputs of this study are intended for use by governments and stakeholders for more effective conservation decisions and threatened species management across Northern Australia. 

Created: 2019-07-16

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

126.72455,-11.8454 113.36517,-20.28238 113.36517,-39.35094 130.59174,-33.41272 136.91986,-38.25508 152.38861,-46.54343 153.79486,-18.29151 142.54486,-9.77357 142.89642,-9.42693 126.72455,-11.8454

133.58001708985,-27.985184766934

Identifiers
  • Local : 41fd66ea8dfe21fa2f099969d25d6bf9
  • Local : https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/f434053abfdb9a433d9bcdf63f1e1703
  • DOI : 10.25903/5d2d3d79a6837