Dataset

Processes at the soil-root interface determine the different responses of nutrient limitation and metal toxicity in forbs and grasses to nitrogen enrichment

The University of Western Australia
Zhang, Wen-Hao ; Tian, Qiuying ; Lu, Peng ; Ma, Pengfei ; Zhou, Huirong ; Yang, Ming ; Zhai, Xiufeng ; Chen, Mengmeng ; Wang, Hong ; Li, Wenchao ; Bai, Wenming ; Lambers, Hans
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.5061/dryad.vdncjsxs4&rft.title=Processes at the soil-root interface determine the different responses of nutrient limitation and metal toxicity in forbs and grasses to nitrogen enrichment&rft.identifier=10.5061/dryad.vdncjsxs4&rft.publisher=Dryad Digital Repository&rft.description=Nutrient limitation and metal toxicity have been implicated in changes of grassland communities by nitrogen (N) deposition. Belowground processes, especially those at the soil-root interface, play important roles in determining variation in nutrient concentrations in plants. However, few studies have specifically focused on the roles of these processes in mineral-element acquisition in grassland plants in response to N enrichment. Here we investigated the contributions of belowground processes at the soil-root interface to the differential acquisition of phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca) and manganese (Mn) by forbs and grasses of a temperate steppe in response to N addition by combining field and glasshouse experiments. Nitrogen addition increased the concentrations of both leaf P ([P]) and Mn ([Mn]) and decreased leaf [Ca] of forbs, while it had little effects on leaf concentrations of these elements in grasses. Nitrogen addition led to a higher activity of acid phosphatase in the rhizosphere of forb, and greater release of protons and carboxylates from forb roots than grass roots, contributing to the differential [P], [Ca] and [Mn] in leaves of forbs and grasses. Applying oxalate to soil to simulate the release of carboxylates by N enrichment enhanced [P] and [Mn], and decreased [Ca] in the soil solution. However, addition of hydrogen-ion increased [P], [Mn] and [Ca] in the soil solution. Lime addition mitigated the N addition-induced soil acidification, while it did not abolish the stimulatory effect of short-term N addition on leaf [P] and [Mn] of forbs. Therefore, we conclude that differences in the ecophysiological processes at the soil-root interface account for changes in leaf [P], [Ca] and [Mn] under short-term N addition, and that soil acidification aggravates the responses of these elements, especially [Ca] and [Mn], to long-term N enrichment. Synthesis: Our results highlight the contribution of belowground processes, especially those at the soil-root interface, to variation in plant element concentrations between dominant forbs and grasses in the temperate steppe. These findings greatly enhance our mechanistic understanding of the effects of N deposition on grassland communities.,The dataset was collected from long-term nitrogen addition experiments in a temperate steppe, and we included the original data used for publication.,&rft.creator=Zhang, Wen-Hao &rft.creator=Tian, Qiuying &rft.creator=Lu, Peng &rft.creator=Ma, Pengfei &rft.creator=Zhou, Huirong &rft.creator=Yang, Ming &rft.creator=Zhai, Xiufeng &rft.creator=Chen, Mengmeng &rft.creator=Wang, Hong &rft.creator=Li, Wenchao &rft.creator=Bai, Wenming &rft.creator=Lambers, Hans &rft.date=2020&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Nutrient limitation and metal toxicity have been implicated in changes of grassland communities by nitrogen (N) deposition. Belowground processes, especially those at the soil-root interface, play important roles in determining variation in nutrient concentrations in plants. However, few studies have specifically focused on the roles of these processes in mineral-element acquisition in grassland plants in response to N enrichment. Here we investigated the contributions of belowground processes at the soil-root interface to the differential acquisition of phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca) and manganese (Mn) by forbs and grasses of a temperate steppe in response to N addition by combining field and glasshouse experiments. Nitrogen addition increased the concentrations of both leaf P ([P]) and Mn ([Mn]) and decreased leaf [Ca] of forbs, while it had little effects on leaf concentrations of these elements in grasses. Nitrogen addition led to a higher activity of acid phosphatase in the rhizosphere of forb, and greater release of protons and carboxylates from forb roots than grass roots, contributing to the differential [P], [Ca] and [Mn] in leaves of forbs and grasses. Applying oxalate to soil to simulate the release of carboxylates by N enrichment enhanced [P] and [Mn], and decreased [Ca] in the soil solution. However, addition of hydrogen-ion increased [P], [Mn] and [Ca] in the soil solution. Lime addition mitigated the N addition-induced soil acidification, while it did not abolish the stimulatory effect of short-term N addition on leaf [P] and [Mn] of forbs. Therefore, we conclude that differences in the ecophysiological processes at the soil-root interface account for changes in leaf [P], [Ca] and [Mn] under short-term N addition, and that soil acidification aggravates the responses of these elements, especially [Ca] and [Mn], to long-term N enrichment. Synthesis: Our results highlight the contribution of belowground processes, especially those at the soil-root interface, to variation in plant element concentrations between dominant forbs and grasses in the temperate steppe. These findings greatly enhance our mechanistic understanding of the effects of N deposition on grassland communities.,The dataset was collected from long-term nitrogen addition experiments in a temperate steppe, and we included the original data used for publication.,

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Associated Persons
Ming Yang (Creator)Wen-Hao Zhang (Creator); Qiuying Tian (Creator); Peng Lu (Creator); Pengfei Ma (Creator); Huirong Zhou (Creator); Xiufeng Zhai (Creator); Mengmeng Chen (Creator); Hong Wang (Creator); Wenchao Li (Creator); Wenming Bai (Creator)

Issued: 2020-09-29

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