Dataset

Dataset for 'Thermal plasticity of the cardiorespiratory system provides cross-tolerance protection to fish exposed to elevated nitrate'

The University of Queensland
Dr Rebecca Cramp (Author) Mr Daniel Gomez Isaza (Author) Professor Craig Franklin (Author)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.14264/c5155b2&rft.title=Dataset for 'Thermal plasticity of the cardiorespiratory system provides cross-tolerance protection to fish exposed to elevated nitrate'&rft.identifier=10.14264/c5155b2&rft.publisher=The University of Queensland&rft.description=Exposure to nitrate is toxic to aquatic animals due to the formation of methaemoglobin and a subsequent loss of blood-oxygen carrying capacity. This dataset represents a suite of cardiorespiratory metrics that aim to establish whether chronic nitrate exposure affects thermal tolerance in silver perch. &rft.creator=Dr Rebecca Cramp&rft.creator=Mr Daniel Gomez Isaza&rft.creator=Professor Craig Franklin&rft.date=2020&rft.relation=https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:32c9328&rft_subject=Blood oxygen affinity&rft_subject=Multiple stressors&rft_subject=Temperature&rft_subject=Thermal acclimation&rft_subject=Oxygen equilibrium curves&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Access:

Other view details

Open Access

Permitted Re-use with Acknowledgement

Contact Information

r.cramp@uq.edu.au

Full description

Exposure to nitrate is toxic to aquatic animals due to the formation of methaemoglobin and a subsequent loss of blood-oxygen carrying capacity. This dataset represents a suite of cardiorespiratory metrics that aim to establish whether chronic nitrate exposure affects thermal tolerance in silver perch.

Issued: 24 10 2020

Data time period: 2019 to 06 2020

Click to explore relationships graph
Subjects

User Contributed Tags    

Login to tag this record with meaningful keywords to make it easier to discover

Identifiers